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fogood o ill and embodied what was important about the year. the magazine's list included mohamed morsi, tim cook and malala yousafzai, the pakistani teach ager shot for advocating girl's education. rick stengel joins me now. he's the managing editor of time. how do you go about selecting the person of the year. and in the end you decide. >> and in the end i decide. >> rose: don't you love privilege? >> (laughs) it weighs on your shoulders alwa time, as you know. probably beginning in the middle of the year we start thinking about it, a month or so later i start asking people like you, members of the "time" 100, our correspondents, editors, writers start sending in suggestions and have meetings and then we start talking about ideas, tloung out names, sometimes it's not a person but a group of people, like last year, the protest. the end we whittle it down to a short list and then we choose. >> what is it you that you measure them by? >> it's a historical thing, charlie. you measure them in part by past person of the year winners. i always like to feel the person who wins person of the y
with president mohammed morsi with assuming dictatorial powers and ramming through a constitution that many fear will turn egypt into an islamic state. david shanker is the director of the program on arab politics at the washington institute for mere east policy and the former middle east adviser to secretary of defense donald rumsfeld. thank you so much for joining us. >> my pleasure. heather: you were there just prior to morsi's power grab. what was the mood then and did you see this coming? >> i think the brotherhood was very confident and morsi took the opportunity of course after the hamas negotiations of doing this. and i think he thought that he had it in the bag. the people were -- the liberals, the so-called liberals i think were upset, but there was no sign that they were going to actually unify and this really pushed it over the edge. heather: so they have banded together. what about the role of the military, in terms of morsi? the military backed the previous president hosni mubarak. on thursday they intervened for the first time in these latest clashes. what is their role with morsi
, the party of mohammed morsi. frustrated coptic christians walked out because they said their views weren't being heard. the fate of the constitution won't be clear for another two weeks when egyptians get to vote on the draft. >>> the -- is warning tension could backfire. the reason, that's something of great concern and one group they're worried about is the group the international community has been trying to oust in that region. mark schroeder tells us aqim is actually consolidating and getting stronger and without intervention, he says mali's military won't be able to push them out. >>> it has been 484 days since the u.s. lost its top credit rating. what are we doing to get it back? incomes and consume er spending fell in october. economists said sandy had a significant effect on the numbers. >>> and new problems for susan rice. this is different than what you think i'm about to say. after weeks of criticize m from republicans, she now faces scrutiny over her personal investments. stock holdings listed in her financial disclosure report raise a potential conflict of interest if she w
of the president, mohamed morsi. frustrated coptic christians and liberals walked out before the votes because they said their views weren't being heard. the fate of the constitution won't be clear for another two weeks when egyptians get to vote on the draft. >>> the moritanian president is warning tension in mali could backfire. locals could align with rebels. one group they are concerned about is al qaeda in the islamic magreb. that's the group the international community has been trying to oust in that region. mark schroeder tells us that aqim is actually consolidating and getting stronger in the region. without international military intervention, mali's military won't be able to push them out. he told me he doesn't even have enough guns for his soldiers. >>> it's been 484 days since the u.s. lost its top credit rating. what are we doing get it back? incomes and consumer spending fell in october. experts we spoke to said sandy had a significant impact on the numbers. >>> and new problems for susan rice. this is different than what you think i'm about to say. after weeks of criticism from
? >>> in egypt, president mohamed morsi is calling for talks to end the political crisis in the country. the opposition is calling for a boycott of that meeting. at least six people are dead after protests turned violent. anti-morsi supporters are demonstrating against the president and the new constitution. they say morsi has given himself too much power, but the president says the powers are only temporary and will become void once the new constitution is adopted. >>> now back to the u.s. and the controversy over the benghazi attack. secretary of state hillary clinton will testify at an open congressional hearing. her testimony will follow the release of a report by the state department's accountability review board. the state department has been under fire for its handling of the terror attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. >>> the syrian crisis could reach a new level. with concerns that the syrian regime could possibly use chemical weapons. we'll tell you how the u.s. is reacting. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i was saving big on car insurance. with snapshot, i knew wh
. >> elsewhere in the region, egypt right now, we're seeing these protesters, these anti-mohammed morsi protesters moving closer and closer towards the presidential pass palace in cairo. they're concerned about what morsi is doing as far as democracy in egypt. how worried are you about the situation in egypt? >> i think egypt is key to the region, so the answer is, you've got to be extremely worried when you see instability affecting egypt. this is, again, the birth pangs of proper democracy in some ways, but this struggle is immensely important. obviously what's important in these countries where they've moved to a democratic system is that there is a clear understanding that democracy is not just a way of voting but a way of thinking. pant of that way of thinking is that you've got to protect minorities. you've got to -- democracy doesn't function unless it is accompanied by an open mind. and so you can understand there is a lot of anxiety in egypt about the constitutional changes proposed. and even as the international community obviously applauded egypt's efforts in bringing about t
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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